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From AI to Drones, Smart Technology is Firing Up Wildlife Conservation Globally


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In 2015, the company Dimension Data teamed up with CISCO to launch Connected Conservation, a programme to protect the world’s endangered wildlife population through technology. Their pilot project was at South Africa’s Kruger National Park, where poachers were a great threat to the rhino population. By 2017, rhino poaching in the sanctuary wasreduced by a whopping 96% – a resounding success that has resulted in the expansion of this programme to Kenya, Zambia and Mozambique this year.

This amazing conservation effort was made possible with a combination of technologies like digital data mapping of tourist traffic, thermal imaging, closed circuit TV cameras, biometrics, connection of rangers via multiple devices, the use of IoT (the Internet of things) to share and control information, and cloud backup of all the data. The entire fence line of the park was equipped with sensors and a strong Wi-Fi network ensured that any suspicious movement was immediately notified to the rangers.

Elsewhere in the world, too, technology is proving to be a handy collaborator in wildlife conservation. In June in Cambodia, for instance, the conservation outfit Global Park Defence System set up by Wildlife Alliance, a global conservation network, saved a critically endangered pangolin from being poached when the rangers got alerted of suspicious movement by a hidden camera. Pangolins are the most trafficked animals in the world and some species are critically endangered.

For More: https://weather.com/en-IN/india/news/news/2018-11-26-how-technology-is-aiding-wildlife-conservation

Posted by on Dec 3 2018. Filed under Wildlife. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

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