Climate change may destroy Sundarbans’ tigers in 50 years: Study Draft clean air act presented for immediate approval Environment minister: Brick kilns responsible for 58% air pollution in Dhaka Elephants face ‘time bomb’ in Bangladesh Plastic pollution: One town smothered by 17,000 tonnes of rubbish Toxic black snow covers Siberian coalmining region Homemaker to trendsetter Social behavior of western lowland gorillas ‘It is our future’: children call time on climate inaction in UK With 86% Drop, California’s Monarch Butterfly Population Hits Record Low

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Inside the greenhouse, tiny leaves of wild rocket, iceberg lettuce and pak choi poke through the dirt, each as small as a fingernail. Planters hold calla lilies and dragonfruit, sea samphire and gerberas. Bright strawberries dot buttery green leaves. And there are row after row of vines, draped over wires, leaves as big as dinner plates: snack cucumbers and fragrant basil and nine varieties of tomatoes.

“My basil’s a bit straggly,” head grower Blaise Jowett says, apologetically. “But I’m keeping them for pesto.”

He shouldn’t be too apologetic. Outside of the greenhouse, a camel grazes. Pale pink sand extends to the rocky mountains in the distance. Only the hardiest tufts of green thrust up through the ground. There is no water. There are no trees.

read more: http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20180822-this-jordan-greenhouse-uses-solar-power-to-grow-crops

Posted by on Sep 24 2018. Filed under Environmental livelihood, News at Now, News From Roots. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

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