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Off Tanzania, in one of the world’s richest seas, why is the catch getting smaller?


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Fishing boat XTK191, known as Home Boy, returned to Kivukoni fish market in downtown Dar es Salaam at dawn one day last week. The 15 young men on board the old dhow dropped anchor and heaved their catch over the side for others to run it across the beach to where hundreds of traders milled.

Within an hour of landing in eastern Africa’s largest fish market, Home Boy’s fish, crabs, prawn, lobsters, tuna, squid and shark pups were being sold in impromptu auctions, along with the catches of several dozen other boats.

read more: https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/sep/15/tanzania-dar-es-salaam-illegal-fishers-coral-reef-eco-system-at-risk

Posted by on Sep 17 2018. Filed under Food security, News at Now, News From Roots. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

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