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Tesco and Sainsbury’s ban plastic cotton buds to cut waste


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UK’s two largest supermarket chains will replace the plastic stems with paper ones in all own-brand products by the end of 2017. The UK’s two largest supermarket chains have committed to end the sale of cotton buds with plastic stems, which are the most common litter from toilets flushed on to the country’s beaches. Both Tesco and Sainsbury’s will replace the plastic stick with paper by the end of 2017 in their own-brand products.Other major companies, including  Morrisons, Asda and Boots, are currently considering a plastic ban, while Waitrose, the Co-operative and Johnson & Johnson have already committed to paper stems. The moves follow a growing campaign that now has 130,000 backers. The tide is turning against plastic pollution in the oceans, which is known to harm marine life when they confuse it for food. People eating seafood can also ingest the plastic and, earlier in November, the chief medical officer for England announced she would conduct an investigation into the impact on human health. Plastic bags found on UK beaches by the Marine Conservation Society’s annual beach clean fell by more than half in 2016, after a 5p charge was levied on the bags by the government. Ministers have also said they will ban plastic microbeadsin toiletries, which also wash into the oceans. There are estimated to be 5tn pieces of plastic floating in the world’s seas. Natalie Fee, founder of the City to Sea campaign to cut plastic pollution, said: “We’re delighted with the announcements to ‘switch the stick’ from plastic to paper stem buds. Whilst they still shouldn’t be flushed, this move will stop millions of plastic stems ending up in the marine environment each year and is a huge win in the fight against marine plastic pollution.” A spokesman for Sainsbury’s said: “We have been working hard to improve this product. Our new cotton buds, with 100% biodegradable stems, will be available before the end of 2017.” A Tesco’s spokesman said: “We’re committed to ensuring all of our own label cotton bud products will be made with paper stems, and will do this by the end of 2017.”

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/nov/30/tesco-and-sainsburys-ban-plastic-cotton-buds-to-cut-waste

Posted by on Dec 1 2016. Filed under No waste. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

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