plunging into a pool of waste without safety equipment and barely any clothing, a young clean sewer line in Paltan area. Often times, these worker sustains injuries from working in cramped drains or suffer from eye problem, respiratory and skin diseases Environmental charter for the new government America’s renewable energy capacity is now greater than coal It is time to impose ban on single-use plastic A quarter of Dhaka’s wetlands gone Australia’s climate and extinction crises are crying out for political solutions Team of Minamata mercury waste experts at UNEP, Osaka, Japan on May 27,2019 Straws Made Of Wild Grass Are Vietnam’s Newest Zero-Waste Option Organic farmers association in Kerala wins international award for innovative farming An International Conference on Minamata Convention

The Biggest Issues for Wildlife and Endangered Species in 2019


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Wildlife didn’t have an easy go of it in 2018. We lost the last male northern white rhino, the vaquita porpoise continued its slide toward extinction, poachers kept targeting pangolins and other rare creatures, and through it all the Trump administration kept trying to whittle away at key protections for endangered species.

So with that rough bit of recent history, what does 2019 hold?

Well, in most cases it won’t be pretty. There will be more blood, more habitat loss, more legislative attacks and more extinctions—but at the same time, there will also be signs of hope and progress on many levels. Here are some big issues that experts say we should be watching in 2019:

Climate Chaos

Of course, climate change will continue to threaten species around the world in 2019. “The impacts of climate change aren’t showing signs of slowing, and this administration refuses to recognize it,” says Charise Johnson of the Union of Concerned Scientists. “Water temperatures are rising, increased flooding, deforestation, fires, storms—these are all things that affect a species’ existence.”

And new threats continue to emerge. “There’s been a lot of discussion about how global climate change affects ocean acidification, and now there’s emerging evidence that the even greater threat is reduced oxygen levels,” says noted conservationist William Laurance of James Cook University. A study published last month found that ocean deoxygenation could have a major impact on zooplankton, one of the building blocks for the ocean food web. Deoxygenation also causes increased algal growth, like the red tides that choked the coasts of Florida this past year and killed hundreds of manateesand tens of thousands of fish.

For More: https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/extinction-countdown/the-biggest-issues-for-wildlife-and-endangered-species-in-2019/

Posted by on Jan 14 2019. Filed under Wildlife. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

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