Ten more elephants poisoned by poachers in Zimbabwe Exxon, BP and Shell back carbon tax proposal to curb emissions Ratty returns: hundreds of water voles released in UK’s biggest reintroduction Marine expert warns of climate emergency as fish abandon tropical waters Plastic polluted Arctic islands are dumping ground for Gulf Stream Plastic polluted Arctic islands are dumping ground for Gulf Stream EU moves to restrict hormone-disrupting chemical found in plastics ‘Plankton explosion’ turns Istanbul’s Bosphorus turquoise Climate change study in Canada’s Hudson Bay thwarted by climate change Global demand for coal falls in 2016 for second year in a row

Reining in the Rain


1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (No Ratings Yet)

Where many see rain as a nuisance, Japan’s Makoto Murase sees a freshwater resource for millions. The World Health Organization estimates nearly 800 million people lack access to safe, clean drinking water. In Bangladesh alone, nearly 40 million people in rural villages are forced to either buy water or spend hours fetching it from polluted ponds. But Murase, a world authority on rainwater recycling, is aiming to change that. Educated as a pharmacologist, Murase is a former career civil servant who worked in a municipal environmental protection department in Sumida City, a district in east Tokyo where sewers frequently flooded during the rainy season. In the early 1980s, he pioneered the recycling of urban rainwater when he designed a water recovery system that collected, filtered, and stored rainwater in large underground holding tanks, easing flooded sewers and providing a resource used for irrigation, toilets, washing, and drinking. An early system installed in Tokyo’s Sumo Stadium proved so successful that the city eventually required underground rainwater tanks for all new buildings, including the Skytree, Japan's tallest. Over a thousand Tokyo buildings now harvest and recycle rainwater, and Murase is affectionately known as "Dr. Skywater." "I decided to call rainwater ‘sky water’ after learning the wisdom of our ancestors, who believed it was a gift from heaven and called it sky water with great respect,'' he says. Since retiring from his city job, Murase started the Institute for Sky Water Harvesting and Skywater Bangladesh, a social enterprise he hopes will bring low-cost rainwater collection systems to the country’s rural villages. The Rolex Laureate has also published a book, Sky Water: Rain in Japan and Around the World.

Read more: http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2016/11/makoto-murase-explorer-moments-rain-water-conservation-Japan/

Posted by on Nov 14 2016. Filed under News From Roots, Water & Wetland. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

Leave a Reply

Polls

Which Country is most Beautifull?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...